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friend, he and i have been together and political offices, a government responsibility for a very long time. more than three years. when he decided not to run again and my other colleague who was part of team north dakota was defeated, it was less rewarding for me personally to be here. less enjoyable for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the oth
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth annual sitting. the sitting have become an accomplished part of the parking parliament calendar. -- they have become so well established. and leader of the house, i am the representative of the government to this house of commons. and of the house of commons to the government. but today i am pleased to be able to be here to representative both the government and the house with you the youth parliament. i know, what is said here today will be heard both
smaller increases to social security over time, why it would be a saving to the government. whether you like that or not it is actually not a terrible idea even though i'm going to get another bunch of tweets from people who said it is not terrible, may not be ideal. why are we having this conversation with a day and a half to go? 500-some-odd days ago they came one this concept of a sequester. they knew the fiscal cliff was coming. 12 years' notice we had these bush tax cuts were going to expire. these kind of discussions require air they require time they require debate and we are now having them. when john thune says he hopes that senator reid brings a bill to the floor and it is open to discussion and amendment, not today. not today. it's too late for that. make a deal and stop markets from going over the edge, stop this economy from going over the edge. they will ruin a good economy, martin this is ridiculous, irresponsible, disgusting behavior. >> you don't want to hear this kind of detailed conversation going on now? >> no. no. >> you want to get a deal done? >> forget t no more
't he accepting it ne fuel? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involvinged incluesing publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount enemies of the system sucting to licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would billion far more something more owneress. that's what david cameron was addressing in some of of his concerns. how did it feel? >> we saw something rather by zard there. we heard from the two men, the prime minister and the deputy frimse. there were -- separation. one of those two men thinks new law is skential and the other not is not. >> in the backgrounds for a moment, you've got the last few months. will continue to cross party talks. but simultaneously you also god the crime city. try now that new regulator could be brought in into this new law if i
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
this is coming up. the government will continue to function for a couple more months. emergency measures will be used to keep the money flowing, so to speak. this is unrelated to the fiscal cliff, so it's an additional problem that everybody has to deal with. of course the worst thing is we know how horrible it was the last time the debt ceiling needed to be raised in the summer of 2011, it went down to the wire and it looked as if there was a chance the united states would not raise the borrowing limit and default. we heard talk about social security payments not going out and that kind of thing. that's all led to the first downgrade in the u.s. credit rating, the stock market tanked. that was a ugly scenario. on top of the fiscal cliff, we may go through this all over again. it's another drag on the markets and on the whole economy at exactly the wrong time. >> when you say drag, though, give us an example of what you mean. we talked about january 2nd, everybody goes back to work and markets open. are we going to see a lot of volatility. all of a sudden it crashes down at once. what ha
a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former la
't have a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is t
our government is trying to do with the bickering and tearing each other down, tearing the country down. why in the world can these supposedly intelligent groups of men and women not get together to work out for the best interest of all concerned, all 330 billion americans, what is the best course to take? just take it. none of this squabbling. get together, folks. let's have some harmony in warrington. that is what we need. we need more on selfishness. a lot less ulterior motives. no more 2000 page bills that no one can understand. we do not need more of that crap in washington. we need some representation. get your act together. >> we are going next to minneapolis, minnesota. john, welcome. >> all of this gridlock going on right now, what is clearly evident to me is that the republican party has pure interests in mind. they're willing to touch medicare and social security, but not their own salaries, no steps against their own party to take the needs of the american people. how can you act together with a party that works purely for their own interests. my question is -- what can
communications are looked at by the government. people want amendments. unfortunately congress once again is acting at the last minute trying to renew something about to expire and there is probably not the time to do revisions that are necessary. that's a problem here. harris: because critics want this to be revised as you just put it. the white house doesn't. it wants it to pass the way it is. a lot of people are in favor of it because it is helping to keep us safe since there is homegrown terror in the united states and we need to find it. i want to if which have the words put it up on the screen. kentucky senator rand paul had this to say on the senate floor yesterday. and what he was basically saying is that this interferes and disputes the power of the fourth amendment. and that it needs to be changed. again, dan, you say we may not see any changes to it because the deadline is tuesday? >> it is really important to note that even the supporters of renewing acknowledge there needs to be reform. there needs to be more oversight. we need to know more how the fisa court works. we want m
, to pay for more government spending that doesn't help us with the deficit. and you hear members of congress, your republican colleagues who say, in my district, they don't want more spending. and that's how they see this money being spent. >> two things i would say. first of all, that is not the democratic position. no one that i know of is arguing that all of the increased revenue should go for increased spending nap simply isn't the case. by the way not having the sequester doesn't mean increased spending. it mean not having spending cuts. i voted against the idea of a sequester. i think it's not right way to do it. what the republicans want to do is spend more on defense. let me deal with this notion that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jerse
distract from what the country needs to do. we need to deal with our run-away government spending, the government is spending too much money. tax increases are not part of cutting the budget. tax increases are what politicians do instead of reforming government. as long as tax increases are on the table, the politicians never even think about reforming government. >> i understand you've been on this fight for a long time and you've been devoted to the whole idea of not seeing taxes increase anywhere. what we're down to is largely a political battle over the increase in marginal tax rates based on what you earn. i understand there's a lot more to this puzzle. but on that front, because that's the one that gets most of the ink around here. it's the whether people who earn more than 250,000 or 2z 400,000 or a million should pay more tax. the point i'm trying to get at is that's not going to hurt the economy. that's all we're talking about. paying 4.6 percentage points higher on your income over 250,000, the evidence isn't there that that's going to hurt the economy. >> it will take t
a deep channel. >>> and america's population growth is slowing down. the government says it's due to lower birth rates during the economic recession and lower immigration numbers. as we start the new year, there will be 315 million people in the united states. the population, though, has grown less than .75% since 2010. so a slower rate of growth. still, 315 million people is -- >> seems like enough people in some places, that's for sure. thanks, lisa. >>> hopes have been crushed and families in the making ripped apart. a new law bans americans from adopting russian children. ng tom about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> from what we surmise, this meeting at the white house between the presiden
,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have an adverse effect. >> we handle more cars, we handle more farm and construction equipment than any other u.s. port. patti ann: we're learning that adverse effect could take a toll on the economy. fox business network's stuart varney has more for us on that this morning. good morning, stu. >> good morning, patti ann.
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
day pain relief with just two pills. >>> look, look. >> this is syria today. government war plains bombed the city of homs. it happened in alep powe as well. at least 80 people are reported dead across the country today. air strikes like these or in street fighting. these twin boys were among the 160 people killed in syria yesterday. it is so tragic. this is where they died. the man who shot this video said that syrian military artillery hit their home. it happen add few miles from where more than a hundred civilians died in a government air strike just a few days ago. >>> a man sent to syria to try to negotiate the end to the civil war says it could be over in a come of months. he's meeting with both sides in damascus, the rebels as well as the leaders. he speaks for thenited nations, not just syria. >> translator: some say i have come here to market a russian american project. i wish i could. there is no russian american problem so hence i did not come to market it. >> i want to bring in richard ross. brahimi is somebody who's very well respect bud somebody who's optimistic. when
the deficit, not new government spending. shannon? >> how confident are the "cook's essentialsal" democrats about the ability to get this done? >> reporter: congressional democrats do not sound over confident. they recognize this is a heavy lift between the top two senators in the next couple of hours. but a leading new york democrat sounded cautiously optimistic. >> there is certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid. but there is a real possibility of a deal. i have been a legislator for 37 years. and i have watched how these things work. they almost always happen at the last minute. >> reporter: we are getting down to the left minute. the threshold for extending the bush tax cuts. president obama campaigned campn capping it at $250,000, raising taxes on those who earn more than $250k, but some of the discussion and it is buzz around capitol hill has been about perhaps going to the $400,000 mark. the question is, will you get enough republicans to buy in if that is the deal? shannon? >> thanks to mike on capitol hill. we will continue to check in. now to ed
down the deficit? if you are going to use it for more government spending we don't want a part of it. senator mcconnell on the republican side seemed to get frustrated because he felt like the democrats were slow walking the th, 18 hours without a response. mcconnell made a call to a well known senator, joe biden to see if he could help. >> we're willing to work with whoever can help. no single issue remains an impossible sticking point. a sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. >> reporter: as senate aide says it was designed to try to jumpstart the talks and consequences of getting a tax increase is a huge concern. >> gregg: what went awry in these talks? >> you heard senator thune. a fiscal cliff deal is a new way calculating inflation that would lower social security payments. democrats say they would do it as part of much bigger deal but it was off the table for the smaller deal they are working on. so democrats called it a poison pill. >> at some point, negotiating process, it appears there are things that stopped us fro
for them to be a governing party in any way, particularly in the house of representatives. they are an oppositional party there. but it makes it impossible for john boehner to govern in any effective way to make any sort of negotiation with the president to avoid a fiscal cliff. and the larger issue is that the national populous as a whole wants to see congress get stuff done. they want the accomplishments. so it works for republicans in some statewide races, mostly not but it's not a national agenda. >> allow me to reintroduce myself as a tea party spokesperson. what they say is they are a governing party. you said they're not. they say they are a governing party and they right now are causing the government to completely rewire the way that it deals with the deficit. and they say that there is pain in that process. but the long-term debate and the reason why they don't need to be inside the meeting room is they've got so many of the people in that room afraid of them that we are having a debate between how much to cut the deficit and not to do jobs or stimulus and the th
a archaic 1947 law, unless the new bill is passed by december 31st, the government will be forced to buy vast quantities of milk at twice the wholesale rate. two bills are in congress. the senate passed one for $23 billion in savings. the house is looking to enact 35 billion. the sticking point the full house of representatives hasn't approved the bill. >> the farm bill is like this low hanging ornament on the congressional christmas tree that if they just embrace it, they can automatically come up with tens of billions of dollars in budget savings. and then they can figure out where else they need to cut spending after that. >> reporter: the secretary of agriculture tom vilsack has said his department is preparing a case the permanent law comes into effect. temporary solution is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation. harris? harris: is there anything besides milk we need to be aware of? are we looking potentially at higher prices among many farming commodities for example? >> reporter: yeah. it is not just the cows. it is the crops too. it is possibility the go
the world. look at japan and europe. the japanese government is the glaring war on japanese citizens. it will create inflation. if the japanese citizens start to dump their bonds, they have been a bigger part then japan recently. that is a big problem for us. their euro has been quietly depreciating. if that goes out, that is a much bigger fiscal cliff. if the buyers of treasuries become sellers. liz: there are a lot of "if" in your discussion. the bond markets are still pretty -- nothing from the bottom vigilantes yet. you were a clinton advisor. you saw in the mid- 90s bond yields really spike higher. that is the issue. if we see the economy healing, bond yields could go up. investors say, wait a second, why invest for bond. >> that is the key issue. we have not seen interest rates spike for a simple reason. nobody has confidence in the economy. nobody believes we will have robust economic growth. we could be heading towards a recession. especially given the disappointing christmas sales. i am frankly skeptical about what will happen with our economy either way. i think we will go
to cut elsewhere. >> reporter: without new legislation, government price supports for milk will revert to 1949 levels. back then, the process was more laborious, and farmers needed a higher subsidy to cover their costs. dan summer, professor of agricultural economics at the university of california davis, says the new price of milk will be far above what it now costs dairy farmers to produce it. >> it really will be just chaos. nobody really knows how to act. >> reporter: so we would go back to this old farm bill, which would force the government to buy milk at an extremely high price. >> that's right. >> reporter: this could be a windfall for dairy farmers. >> here's the problem for dairy farmers: they don't want chaos in the milk market. it sounds good-- "gee, everybody will double or triple the price"-- but how much milk would people buy at that price? >> reporter: nobody will pay it. >> nobody will pay it. >> reporter: shoppers for milk today couldn't understand why congress can't at least solve this problem. linda vella: >> they all need to be fired. and if we want to continue to
among other factors the political brinksmanship of recent months that highlights america's governance becoming less stable, less effective, and less predictable. we believe this characterization still holds. do you know this congress, your congress, has done more harm than good? do you feel embarrassed being part of a congress that ranks up there with the do-nothing congresses of all time? >> i think america should be embarrassed by its leadership in washington, d.c. but that extends to the white house, senate, and house of representatives. this has been the most predictable disaster coming at us for a number of years, and certainly months. and the fact that we have been unable to do things and instead worried about our next elections instead of the next generation of americans, i think it's sinful and i hope that people turn out those who have been responsible for it. >> congressman, you're a straight shooter, we always appreciate you coming "outfront." >>> next, mixed feelings about gun control. most americans support a ban on assault weapons but also support the nra. >>> plus, alle
is about the fundamental difference, the role of government in americans' lives. lower taxes versus more of a social safety net. and every time they come close to an agreement, it falls apart because they have a fundamentally different idea on the issues. they have this divide in america, randy. >> so what happens next? how likely is it that we'll go over the fiscal cliff? i'm curious about the mood in washington right now. >> there is an increase in optimism because of the mood out of that meeting today. but i still would say the people who are -- placing bets in this town still expect that the nation will go over the fiscal cliff. so still a little bit more hope than what we woke up this morning, but no one is counting on being off on new year's eve. >> randy. >> jessica, thank you, more now on the raw politics, good to see you both. cornell, let me start with you here, the president said he wanted to see a straight up or down vote. as we mentioned that could happen in the senate. we could lose the up or down vote. >> you are going to see something come out of the senate. you have to p
and the republican parties. it's about the role of government in americans' lives. lower taxes versus more of a social safety net. and every time they come close to a deal, it falls apart because they have this fundamental disagreement about ideas. that's how we got here. they cannot agree on this basic notionation over this idealogical divide in america. >> what happens next? how likely it is we will go over the fiscal cliff. i'm curious what the mood is like in washington, d.c. right now? >> there's an infinitesimal improvement in washington because of the meeting today, but i still would say the odds, the people placing bets in this town still expect that the nation will go over the fiscal cliff. still a little more hope than when we woke up this morning, but no one is counting on being off on new year's eve. >> jessica, thanks. more now on the raw politics with "new york times" columnist raffle, and cornell belcher. the president said he wanted to see a straight up or down vote. as we mentioned, that will happen on monday in the senate. he could lose that up or down vote. >> what you'r
geithner says the government will hit the debt ceiling on monday and he is launching an emergency plan to avert a crisis. amm eamon javers is live. what do we know? >> the president is coming back early, a couple days earlier than his vacation. did a little bit of jogging, working out in the gym over his vacation. now he will be,ing would out on this fiscal cliff. the senate is coming back and the house of representatives is going to have a conference call for all republicans later on today and then yesterday, we saw the secretary of the treasury, tim geithner, announced the $16.4 trillion debt limit is going to be reached by monday, that was a little bit surprising to people who haven't been following this kind of thing and raises the stakes for the fiscal cliff end game because the white house had wanted a debt ceiling deal as part of the overall deal here on the fiscal cliff. republicans have been resisting that by announcing the debt ceiling limit will be held on monday, ratchets up the pressure to include the debt ceiling piece in the final package, whatever that may be, but still
. that includes those budget cuts for most government agencies, the sequester. that may happen at least in the short term. it doesn't seem to be on the table now. also, the medicare doc fix. we don't know for sure if that's going to be in this deal or not. a lot of other pieces still on the table and in limbo for now. >> okay. lisa desjardins, we'll be watching with you, thanks. >>> as you may have guessed, uncertainty over the fiscal cliff is having a ripple effect from washington to wall street. u.s. stocks ended the session in the red on friday for the fifth straight day. a triple-digit loss for the dow, that tumbled 158 points. the nasdaq lost almost 26 points while the s&p 500 shed almost 16 points. >>> in washington, each side of the aisle is pleading its case directly it the taxpayer. both the president and the republicans talking about the fiscal cliff in their weekly addresses. the president said yesterday he was modestly optimistic about a deal, but here he seems to hint at his own plan b if the senate can't reach a deal. >> if an agreement isn't reached on time, then i'll urg
's government unleashes its most sophisticated weapons of the war. missiles from iran. we'd like to welcome our viewers here in the united states and around the world. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm candy crowley and you're in "the situation room." >>> i want to begin with a crisis you probably don't know is coming and, of course, is just about to hit. barring a last minute deal, union dock workers at more than a dozen major ports will go on strike this weekend. meaning just about everything we buy, from clothes to cars, can't be unloaded. the strike would impact 14 port along the eastern seaboard in gulf coast, including the port of baltimore and that's where we find cnn's brian todd live. the potential impact of this is pretty big. >> reporter: it's huge, candy. right here, this is one of the most crucial ports for commerce in this region. the sieger terminal. you can see massive container ships sitting in port. this is the port terminal with the bustling operations, containers still being moved in and out of here by a truck that are being offloaded from the ships here at the terminal. about
each year. today a new sign the russian government could soon ban all of those adoptions entirely. russia's president vladimir putin weighing in on the matter today. what his decision could mean for the children waiting to join families right here in the united states. >>> and the latest on the condition of former president george h.w. bush after his spokesperson confirmed "a series of setbacks" have put the president in the intensive care unit. we are live outside the hospital. stay close. >>> family and friends now visiting the former president george h.w. bush who is hospitalized in houston, texas. doctors moved president bush to the intensive care unit after a series of setbacks including a fever and cough that were not going away. the president is the oldest live willing former leader of our nation at age 88. but today in his e-mail to his staff he suggested the president is not on his death bed. he said "president bush would ask me to tell you to please put the harps back in the closet." randy wallace from our fox station kriv fox 26 live outside the hospital there in housto
enough revenue to cover government for agent eight days, seven or eight days and what do you do with the other 350-plus days leftover? you cannot continue to run trillion dollar deficits every year, because we are already at $16 trillion in debt. what we have is a debt crisis and quite frankly, i think that to our children, to our grandchildren, it is absolutely immoral that all of this would be kicked down the road, kicking that can down the road, and then heaped over on their heads. >> well, it is a little bit immoral that it is happening today and forget the grandchildren, but how about us? >> well, i agree with you, and well, that is why you have got inaction that you are looking at. hr-8, ali, that was a bill filed in january 2011 by the speaker. the senate knew it was coming to them, and the house knew it was coming to the floor, and they worked the bill and they got bipartisan support and that would have extended tax reductions for everybody. >> right. and it had bipartisan support, so that the thing is that it is inaction, and quite frankly, i hope that my colleagues in
to trim the size and scope of government, whether it was the bush tax cuts a decade ago or whether it was the debate over the debility ceiling just over a year ago is going to likely end up as an effort to expand the size and scope of government. that's something that can only happen in washington. >> eric: both of those guys make very good points. a lot of people are asking why would you say go over the fiscal cliff? i have a lot to lose if we go over the fiscal cliff. my taxes would go up. i'm heavily invested in the stock market. it will probably take a big hit. but in the long run, the only way to solve america's debt problem -- we have a debt problem. we have a very bad debt problem. we're on our way to $20 trillion in debt, maybe 25 in the next five to ten years. the only way to fix that is go over the fiscal cliff 'cause clearly democrats don't want to cut spending. they'll have to be forced into that and the only way that happens is hit the sequestration, the things that the fiscal cliff will bring of the that's why. i'll take the medicine, the pain now for a healthier econ
, but public policy makers, people who are in government need to look after public employees whether they're firefighters or teachers. and these kinds of weapons -- we're talking about urban situations as well. there's no argument, not a hunting argument, not a self-protection argument for this kind of weapon. and i think that's where the political debate is going to go shorply when it comes to assault weapons. >> if you go with lapierre about arming our teachers and schools, we should arm firefighters. where does it end? >> which no firefighters would want. and how are you supposed to check as well in a firefighter situation what the mental state of the person you're trying to rescue is? it makes no sense at all. and again, if you are leading, you're an executive in government you have to look at our employees as well. >> one of the things that struck me about the press conference and on meet the press, is the number of factual errors from lapierre. we're going to look at this and talk about it on the other side. >> killers, robbers, rapists, gang members, violent crime is increasing aga
branches of the government not willing to make the deal they know they have to make. everybody wants to play the blame game. this is about to put us over the edge. >> perry, i want to start with you. if perception is reality and the blame is going to matter to somebody, which side is it really going to matter to? ivities the blame is on both sides. what's driven this whole process is republicans are very opposed to -- just the republicans who will vote for any tax increase. we learned last week from the plan b vote. once we go over the cliff, republicans are ready for a tax cut, not an increase. right now that's what the big challenge is. >> chip, is that the biggest strategy here, get to the third and pass the third, the new congress comes in, boehner danger doesn't exist anymore, his speakership stays in place and grover norquist gives a thumbs up to up? >> i don't think that was the strategy a week ago. i think the speaker was trying to put the deal together, as we've seen the senate not -- i think that may become the strategy. i've always thought they would wait until the last ho
the government down if you remember in 2011. they didn't care. the president compromised. we finally came up with a deal. when we came to the debt ceiling. and beginning to pay our bills. and continuing to pay our bills. they didn't really care. i think that's what they were set out to do. to close the government. we are in a season where we need to act. >> you, congressman -- >> on something concrete. >> i didn't mean to interrupt you there but it sounds like you think it's a deliberate attempt to take the economy, the government. >> yeah. 55. the tea party members. not john boehner. john boehner's allowed himself to be captured by the fellows. he is above and beyond that. i think he's basically trying to do the right thing but he can't get a vote out of his own party for his own legislation. who does he turn to? the president of the united states? more worried about getting a proposition from the president to turn down then what proposition is he talking about? i think the president has been more than willing to compromise and the democrats in the house of representatives. we need 30 votes
to see i increase my interest because these guys can't run a government, you're looking at going toward a recession where we're playing politics in washington. this is very serious. this is not just beltway rhetoric here. i think that people need to understand to the point of calling their congressional representative in outrage today saying, we should not be at this point. they're playing politics with the actual livelihood of families. this is not something that it will be all right a week or two or three or four. we start to go down that cliff, we don't know whether the momentum downward is going to be very, very damaging. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> you got na smirk on your face. >> maybe. i agree with the reverend that they're playing politics with livelihoods, because it is a huge risk. you're right about that. i disagree a little bit on the sort of dramatic, immediate impact of it. what we could get -- this is a possibility, and i'm trying to be optimistic because it's towards the end of the year. it's been crummy for a lot of people. we could get a deal the third week of january where
like contractors that have been contracting with the federal government to replace the shuttle? and could you comment on where the commercial space ports of the future will be located? >> well, for suborbital manned spaceflight, they can use any airport with a 12,000 foot runway. branson is considering doing it in an isolated place in new mexico. i tried to talk him into doing it in a place where there is an ocean and something worth looking. at any rate, his plan to put spaceports in five or six different countries, he wants to do one or you can let people see the northern lights during your space flight. so he has some really neat ideas about where it could be done. when you look at where funds are available for a space port, there is one planned in dubai. there is not one affordable enough to fly into orbit, so i suggest that we had better solve that problem and then think about what a space port would look like. >> your thoughts on using model aviation as a funnel for youth to get into aircraft engineering, because your friends at the faa are trying to lump us then with the
, saddam's military in kuwait and return right, full governance back to the citizens of kuwait. >> his father once said -- told him, he said, the day i was born that boy is going to west point. it was literally a job he was born to do. boy, did he do it well. the nation is remembering him today. thank you for helping us do that, general spider marks. happy holidays to you. >> you as well. >>> former president george h.w. bush has a message for his admirers around the world. he's not going anywhere. in a message in thursday, his chief of staff said the 41st president's condition is not dire. becker said mr. bush has every intention of staying put and that we can "put the harps back in the closet." the 88-year-old mr. bush is in the intensive care unit of a houston hospital where he's receiving treatment for an elevated fever. >> still has his sense of human. >>> vladimir putin has signed a continue versional bill banning u.s. citizens from adopting russian children. the decision raising tensions between the two countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to puni
would only fund the government for eight days. >> the senate is set to reconvene sunday at 1:00 eastern time. the house expected to be in session sunday. are going to start around 2:00 with the first votes coming around 6:30 p.m. let's head on over to the white house. kristen welker standing by. a lot happening in washington, d.c. a lot happening i would assume at the white house. but how engaged is the presidented to in moving this thing forward? >> reporter: good afternoon, t.j. i am told there are conversations going on at the staff level. as you know, he met with congressional leaders here at the white house for about an hour on friday. now sources who are familiar with that conversation tell me that the president essentially said to lawmakers, you have two options. one, come up with a plan that can make its way through both chambers, or allow his proposal to go through a vote in both chambers. and that's what you heard the president referencing in that sound bite that you just aired, t.j. in the president's proposal it calls for extending the bush era tax cuts for those making $250
extremism. an interest group out of control, not a government. democrats, even red state democrats, take note, sandy hook put a face on unlimited gun rights and an nra run amok. it's time to stop being afraid of the nra. time to stop changing the subject when guns are brought up. you, democratic politicians, can run on common sense gun restrictions, and you can win. for the first time in decades, there is now a political price to be paid for gun extremism, and i have got an idea for your first commercial. did you happen to see wayne lapierre on "meet the press"? that does it for us on "the cycle." karen finney is in the chair for martin bashir and it is all yours. >> thanks, krystal. good afternoon. i'm karen finney in for martin bashir on this thursday, december 27th. the president is back in washington, the senate is working against the clock, and speaker boehner, yeah, he's m.i.a. >> no new negotiations are scheduled. >> congress has five days to strike a deal before the end of the year deadline. >> they're calling it the fiscal cliff. [ speaking foreign language ] >> john boehn
a year with this increase for senior executives in government. so, literally, think about this. they're talking about the fiscal cliff, they're talking about raising taxes and cutting spending. the only thing that's been accomplished thus far is to raise spending by about a billion dollars a year. >> dave: i think in particular rubs americans the wrong way when they see this, members of congress average salary, 174,000. average american, $48,000. that's on top of the fact that we see all the time, they take off, these long recesses and oh, by the way not passing bills and on top of this, this was by executive order, the president did this himself. >> yeah, it was done late at night, obviously, not great politics. i'm not quite sure what the thought process is here, maybe they think it's going to somehow incentivize members of congress to move things in a certain direction, but again, i think it's a terrible idea. it shows the disconnect with the country. keep in mind, washington d.c. last year passed the silicon valley as the town now as the highest per capita income in the country.
to cut government spending. so while this is an important part, there are many chapters that are going to be happening over the next 24 hours, and we will see if they can get it done. the goal to have something ready to look at by sunday. >> thank you, kelly. my eyes did not glaze over, honestly. this has been a rough couple of weeks for john boehner and hard to believe he is the first casualty of the war. as kelly just said, boehner put forward the plan b only to withdraw it when he could not rustle up enough republican votes, and since then he is more of an observer than a player in the crisis. joining me is rob acosta, and "republic's" john stein. as we just heard from kelly o'donnell, they will be faced with needing democrats to get this deal through if we do indeed have a deal, and then he has to go back to the caucus and say, re-elect me as speaker. how does he do that? >> well, these are two separate questions, richard. on the first point, boehner has a tough time corralling some of the republican votes to vote for obama's plan. if the president brings the 250 plan to the house
a lack of accountability. nobody stepped down or stepped aside. they are still retaining the government jobs that they said would step aside. why isn't holder stepping down? >> juan: how is eric holder involved in benghazi? >> kimberly: he is not. >> andrea: they sent in the f.b.i. wink, wink. but holder would get back to us. >> eric: lisa jackson was using a male alias for official business. >> 12,000 e-mails. what are they doing? sending e-mails to each other all over the place. when do they get anything done in washington 12,000 e-mails. i don't think i sent 12,000 e-mails in my life. >> andrea: the biggest failure under her watch was the keystone pipeline. her administration blocked the keystone pipeline. actively her and her boss' orders. she could go. goodbye. >> eric: juan, quickly. she could step aside and not answer. just she should answer. if you're avoiding having your e-mails seen and understood as a public official you are wrong. she has been outstanding public servant. the environmentists are disappointed obama hasn't listened to her more, especially on fracking and pipeli
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